PUBLICATIONS

HIV Australia 2016

Summary of articles published in 2016.

HIV AUSTRALIA Vol. 14 No. 1

HIV, policing and the law

This edition of HIV Australia explores the nexus between HIV prevention, policing practices and the law.

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HEALTH PROMOTION PROFILE Living Well: Women with HIV

There are currently no needle and syringe programs (NSPs) operating in any Australian prisons. This is despite a growing body of international research clearly demonstrating that NSPs have been shown to be safe, beneficial and cost-effective within a variety of prison settings.

INTERNATIONAL FEATURE Harm reduction and drug policy in ASEAN: an uneasy but critical partnership for health and human rights

At a high-level meeting of Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) countries, held in Malaysia in October 2015, ministers yet again reiterated their commitment to rid the region of drugs:

From ‘Evening Boys’ to ‘Evening Girls’: shifting the dynamic between transgender sex workers and the police

‘My work history stems back 30 years before decriminalisation came into place, and things back then weren’t as good as they are today. Police brutality and physical violence from the people passing by on the streets was unacceptable. As a transgender sex worker we were beaten by the police if we spoke out against them, and what they use to do to us.’ – Transgender sex worker.

The Connections Program: a NSW integrated approach to care and engagement for prisoners with a history of illicit drug use

Justice Health and Forensic Mental Health Network (JH&FMHN) is responsible for the provision of health services for people in contact with the forensic mental health and criminal systems throughout New South Wales.

Straight outta WA: tracing the success of a state-wide prison-based BBV education program

People entering the Australian criminal justice system experience extreme health inequities compared to the broader population, with elevated risks for communicable and chronic disease, high levels of drug and alcohol addiction, and little to no prior contact with healthcare services outside of the prison setting.

Hepatitis C and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: closing the gap

When we talk about closing the gap in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, we often have very siloed ideas of what that means: there’s over-incarceration, the health gap and the education gap, for example. But viral hepatitis, and particularly hepatitis C, is one of those areas where it all links together in a horrible cycle that ends up disproportionately affecting Aboriginal people’s health.

Equity inside and out? HIV, treatment access and prisoners

Many people believe that under the Medicare system, all Australians are provided with universal access to health services and pharmaceuticals. However, prisoners have always been excluded from Medicare coverage, with all prison health care provided by state and territory governments.

Phylogenetic analysis as expert evidence in HIV transmission prosecutions

Modern criminal prosecutions rely increasingly on the use of evidence from forensic science. Such evidence can help establish the identity of offenders, place defendants at the crime scene, or support a prosecution narrative.

Police work and blood borne viruses (BBVs): providing information and guidance about risks and responsibilities

Providing information and guidance about risks and responsibilities.

Back to the future? HIV, spitting and perceptions of risk

There are currently no needle and syringe programs (NSPs) operating in any Australian prisons. This is despite a growing body of international research clearly demonstrating that NSPs have been shown to be safe, beneficial and cost-effective within a variety of prison settings.

The problem with Section 79: the call to amend HIV disclosure laws in NSW

The Public Health Act is a key piece of NSW legislation which impacts the lived experience of people living with HIV.

Watching the detectives: a successful policy intervention in Victoria

Despite three decades of education and awareness-raising, misconceptions persist about the risk posed by people living with blood borne viruses (BBVs) in occupational settings.

The role of the police in the HIV response: the Law Enforcement and HIV Network (LEAHN)

Police are the first responders to a range of complex situations involving criminal, civil or public health related issues, some of which may relate to HIV. Law enforcement, HIV and public health are therefore inextricably linked; however many law enforcement agencies do not perceive these connections.

It’s time: a case for trialling a needle and syringe program in Australian prisons

Australia’s decisive and early harm reduction response to HIV is internationally lauded. Alongside the sustained efforts led by the Australian gay community to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV, Australia’s early implementation, expansion and ongoing maintenance of a national needle and syringe program (NSP) stands as one of our most significant and enduring achievements in reducing the local impact of HIV.

Why are we waiting? The urgent need for NSPS in Australian prisons

There are currently no needle and syringe programs (NSPs) operating in any Australian prisons. This is despite a growing body of international research clearly demonstrating that NSPs have been shown to be safe, beneficial and cost-effective within a variety of prison settings.

HIV AUSTRALIA Vol. 14 No. 2

Keeping community at the centre of HIV research

This edition explores the key role of people with HIV & affected communities in research, evaluation & health promotion.