Posters

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G'day zone film program

Throughout the AIDS 2014 conference, AFAO will be screening a diverse array of HIV-related films and health promotion resources produced in Australia. This is the list of films.

Published: 18/07/2014PDF File - 75.0 KB

Your Body Blueprint - Poster

This poster promotes the 'Your Body Blueprint' campaign, which aims to encourage and support people living with HIV to lead healthier lives, reduce the risk of illness, and enhance their quality of life.

Published: 16/04/2013PDF File - 321.2 KB

Fear Less Live More Posters

The Fear Less Live More campaign encourages gay men to communicate more openly about HIV in sexual settings. This link will open the five posters that were part of the campaign.

Published: 28/11/2011PDF File - 978.3 KB
Stop the Drama Downunder

Drama Downunder Posters

Eight posters from the ‘The Drama Downunder’ campaign, which encourages gay men to become more savvy about sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and to get regular sexual health checks.

Published: 14/06/2011PDF File - 1.2 MB

HIV-related stigma in gay and other men who have sex with men in Australia: foremost a matter of a serostatus-based sexual divide

This poster reports on findings of the Barometer survey into HIV-related stigma, which were presented at the 18th international AIDS conference in Vienna in 2010. The survey was conducted by AFAO with the assistance of the National Centre in HIV Social Research.

Published: 17/08/2010PDF File - 115.4 KB

Pride and prejudice: serostatus identity and HIV-related stigma among HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) in Australia

This poster reports on findings of the Barometer survey into HIV-related stigma, which were presented at the 18th international AIDS conference in Vienna in 2010. The survey was conducted by AFAO with the assistance of the National Centre in HIV Social Research.

Published: 17/08/2010PDF File - 65.1 KB
Proud to be black, proud to be gay

Proud to be Black, Proud to be Gay

Proud to be Black, Proud to be Gay is a series of three posters that portray Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander gay men in a fun, strong, and confident light; representing positive role models for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander gay community. The poster series identifies these men as bearers of an important message; encouraging each other to protect themselves against HIV/AIDS and STIs, to wear condoms, to talk to each other about these issues and by doing so, they are also educating their own people and communities.

Published: 01/01/2009PDF File - 166.7 KB
Proud to be black, proud to be gay

Proud to be Black, Proud to be Gay

Proud to be Black, Proud to be Gay is a series of three posters that portray Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander gay men in a fun, strong, and confident light; representing positive role models for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander gay community. The poster series identifies these men as bearers of an important message; encouraging each other to protect themselves against HIV/AIDS and STIs, to wear condoms, to talk to each other about these issues and by doing so, they are also educating their own people and communities. The posters are available in various sizes from your local AIDS Council or PLHIV organisation.

Published: 01/01/2009PDF File - 175.2 KB
Proud to be black, proud to be gay

Proud to be Black, Proud to be Gay

Proud to be Black, Proud to be Gay is a series of three posters that portray Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander gay men in a fun, strong, and confident light; representing positive role models for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander gay community. The poster series identifies these men as bearers of an important message; encouraging each other to protect themselves against HIV/AIDS and STIs, to wear condoms, to talk to each other about these issues and by doing so, they are also educating their own people and communities. The posters are available in various sizes from your local AIDS Council or PLHIV organisation.

Published: 01/01/2009PDF File - 172.1 KB

Cutting it Fine: Ethical Issues in Male Circumcision

Analysis of the ethical implications of the implementation of male circumcision as an HIV biomedical prevention intervention. Bridget Haire's poster presentation at the IAS Conference, Sydney, July 2007. ARCHIVED - some information may be out of date

Published: 19/07/2007PDF File - 3.9 MB

Anwernekenhe 4 - Stronger Together - Toronto Poster

This poster about the epidemic among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the Anwernekenhe conferences was presented at the 16th International AIDS Conference in Toronto in 2006. ARCHIVED - some information may be out of date

Published: 07/08/2006PDF File - 1.6 MB

1994-2004 Anwernekenhe Us Mob

Anwernekenhe is an Arrernte word, meaning “us mob”. Since 1994 AFAO has held 4 conferences, called Anwernekenhe, for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander gay men and sistergirls. 30 October 2004 marked the tenth anniversary of Anwernekenhe I. This poster was issued to celebrate the occasion. ARCHIVED - some information may be out of date

Published: 05/10/2004PDF File - 166.6 KB

Sistergirls Say - Keep Yourself Covered

One of two posters. The posters are a national peer based resource that promotes positive self-esteem and incorporates essential HIV/AIDS and sexual health messages. By promoting positive self-esteem the resource is also able to address underlying issues such as isolation and discrimination. The resource has also been designed to raise awareness of sistergirl identity within the broader HIV/AIDS and sexual health service provision area. ARCHIVED - some information may be out of date

Published: 28/06/2004PDF File - 301.5 KB
Sistergirl with hibiscus

Sistergirls Say - Keep Yourself Covered

One of two posters. The posters are a national peer based resource that promotes positive self-esteem and incorporates essential HIV/AIDS and sexual health messages. By promoting positive self-esteem the resource is also able to address underlying issues such as isolation and discrimination. The resource has also been designed to raise awareness of sistergirl identity within the broader HIV/AIDS and sexual health service provision area. ARCHIVED - some information may be out of date

Published: 28/06/2004PDF File - 494.0 KB

Mother to Child Transmission Poster

In 2000 AFAO funded Treatment Action Campaign (TAC) to undertake a policy and advocacy project focusing on mother-to-child transmission prevention (MTCTP) in South Africa . This poster was produced as part of that project. ARCHIVED - some information may be out of date

Published: 17/12/2002PDF File - 217.5 KB
No-worries.jpg

No Worries

No Worries was a campaign for gay men that answers some common questions about sex and HIV, such as: "Can I still pass on HIV if my last viral load test was 'undetectable? and "Is it safer to fuck than be fucked?" ARCHIVED - some information may be out of date

Published: 16/10/2001PDF File - 939.2 KB

At Home Away - Treat Yourself!

You may be on holidays but your HIV treatments still have to work. Sticking to your dosing schedule will give your pills the best chance of working. Planning ahead means you will be more likely to take your pills at the right time. ARCHIVED - some information may be out of date

Published: 21/06/2001PDF File - 953.1 KB

At Home Away - Seeing The World?

HIV transmission can take place either at home or while you are away. Be prepared when you travel – think about the situations you may find yourself in. Pack condoms and lube – they aren’t available everywhere. ARCHIVED - some information may be out of date

Published: 21/06/2001PDF File - 859.7 KB

"We're Family Too" - A4 PDF

“We’re Family Too!” is a poster designed to address issues of discrimination affecting gay, lesbian, sistergirl and transgender Indigenous Australians. The poster aims to reduce the experience of discrimination, vilification and stigmatisation for Indigenous gay men, lesbians and sistergirls particularly in the area of community based service provision. The “We’re Family Too!” poster is endorsed by the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) and the Australian National Council on AIDS, hepatitis C and Related Diseases (ANCAHRD). This is an A4 size PDF. An A3 size PDF is also available. ARCHIVED - some information may be out of date

Published: 15/05/2000PDF File - 195.4 KB

"We're Family Too" - A3 PDF

“We’re Family Too!” is a poster designed to address issues of discrimination affecting gay, lesbian, sistergirl and transgender Indigenous Australians. The poster aims to reduce the experience of discrimination, vilification and stigmatisation for Indigenous gay men, lesbians and sistergirls particularly in the area of community based service provision. The “We’re Family Too!” poster is endorsed by the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) and the Australian National Council on AIDS, hepatitis C and Related Diseases (ANCAHRD). This is an A3 size PDF. An A4 size PDF is also available

Published: 15/05/2000PDF File - 349.4 KB

Positive Gay Asian Poster - Poster 3

A campaign consisting of three posters targeted at gay Asian men living with HIV and the Asian communities more broadly. The campaign aims to encourage positive gay Asian men to make contact with their local AIDS Council. ARCHIVED - some information may be out of date

Published: 01/05/1999PDF File - 532.5 KB

Positive Gay Asian Poster - Poster 1

A campaign consisting of three posters targeted at gay Asian men living with HIV and the Asian communities more broadly. The campaign aims to encourage positive gay Asian men to make contact with their local AIDS Council. ARCHIVED - some information may be out of date

Published: 01/05/1999PDF File - 474.0 KB

Positive Gay Asian Poster - Poster 2

A campaign consisting of three posters targeted at gay Asian men living with HIV and the Asian communities more broadly. The campaign aims to encourage positive gay Asian men to make contact with their local AIDS Council. ARCHIVED - some information may be out of date

Published: 01/05/1999PDF File - 588.9 KB